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Corban University

Student Success

Measuring Student Success

What makes for a successful college experience? Sometimes as parents it’s easy for us to see grades as being the sole indicator of success. Indeed, grades seem to be the most obvious gauge. However, if getting all A’s is ones only goal and measure of success, then there are a whole lot of opportunities for growth being missed.

The truth is, in order for your student to succeed in college, he or she must be engaged fully in their spiritual, cognitive, emotional and relational development. What does that look like? Here are some indicators that your college student is taking steps toward success in their Corban career.

Engaging in student life.

Sometimes the hardest part of going to college is starting over in finding a social group. There are a lot of activities available to students everyday of the week, from outreach ministries, to athletic events, to dorm and ASB parties. It takes effort, especially for our introverted children, but their college experience will be so much richer and they will learn so much more about themselves if they take opportunities to be involved.

Developing a few close friends.

It’s a process that takes time, but eventually your student will find one or two others with whom they can share their deepest thoughts. Often when a student says they’re homesick, what they mean is they’re “friends sick.” They miss the comfort of having a close relationship. If your student is still looking for that good friend, remind them to be patient, but also suggest they keep reaching out and praying that God would bring them a close friend.

Making mistakes.

That means they are making decisions, and sometimes those decisions don’t work out as planned. Maturity comes from evaluating options, making decisions, and living with and learning from the results of that decision. And the more decisions your student makes, the more he or she will learn.

Speaking with professors outside the classroom.

Professors at Corban love their students and invite them to engage with them outside the classroom. The successful student responds to those invitations and makes connections with their professors. At the very least, your student would benefit by visiting a professor during their office hours, even if it were just to make sure they are on track with the assignments. Chances are, that professor will delve further and ask your student how they are doing in their personal and spiritual life. These are opportunities a student shouldn’t miss.

Seeking to be challenged.

College shouldn’t be a cakewalk for your student. If it is, they’re not getting their money’s worth. Students who push themselves are going to receive the most benefits intellectually, emotionally and spiritually. The key is that your student has the comparable support necessary to face those challenges and grow through them. Corban provides a variety of resources to support students, but they need to be matched by emotional support from home. When a student feels supported, both academically and emotionally, they are more likely to seek out challenges and gain the most from their college experience.

The Difference Between High School & College

Your son or daughter is probably so excited to be a college student that they haven’t given much thought to what it really means. Preparing ahead of time for some of the major differences can assist with the transition from high school to college.

High School College
Time/Schedule Structured and sequential. Typically a daily routine that is stable and predictable. Unstructured. Students are personally responsible for getting up, going to class, managing priorities, and going to bed at a reasonable hour.
Teacher-Student Relationship Significant contact as most classes meet 5 days per week. One-on-one relationships and casual meetings before and after class. Frequent homework reminders. Most classes meet 1 to 3 times per week. Students are expected to meet with faculty during office hours. Work is often self-directed.
Parent/Family Involvement Parents and guardians have access to and monitor grades, assignments, and attendance. Parents contact teachers or counselors directly with concerns. Communication is open and information is freely shared. Students must grant access to academic and financial information due to federal law. Professors and advisors cannot share information with family members about student progress or concerns without the student’s authorization.
Counseling/
Advising
Guidance counselors plot out the 4-year curriculum with the student. Parents may also be involved. Students make appointments with academic advisors every semester and should be prepared prior to each meeting. It is up to the student to correctly map out their course of study, but advisors and offices are available to help.
Freedom Student freedom is usually dictated by scheduled activities and parental guidelines. Students make their own choices about how to use their time. No curfews at Corban.
Academics Students may be able to earn good grades with minimal effort. The class work is evenly distributed throughout the semester. Students are given detailed instructions and support for major papers and projects. Most classes meet 1 to 3 times per week. Students are expected to meet with faculty during office hours. Work is often self-directed.
Advocacy Parents and guardians have access to and monitor grades, assignments, and attendance. Parents contact teachers or counselors directly with concerns. Communication is open and information is freely shared. Students must learn to advocate for themselves by asking for help when they need it and taking advantage of university support services and resources. Parents are not able to make appointments on behalf of a student.