Skeleton in the Closet

For many with eating disorders, the food they eat isn’t seen as nourishment, but as an obsession or poison.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health and research published in leading psychiatric journals, those with anorexia, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder have higher suicide rates than any other mental condition.

Newly published research findings reported by Corban Assistant Professor of Biology Sarah Comstock, Ph.D., address a new area of concern; women struggling with unhealthy eating habits while pregnant may also predispose their children to obesity and have a significant impact on the body image of the next generation.

On Oct. 15, the complexities and human side of eating disorders will be explored during a free public forum at Corban University. Comstock and award-winning photographer Fritz Liedtke, whose book and gallery exhibit “Skeleton in the Closet” presents firsthand accounts of women and men who have struggled with eating disorders, will hold an open and candid conversation about this issue. 

During “The Skeleton in the Closet, The Intersection of Art and Science Explore: Body Image, Eating Disorders, Obesity and Pregnancy” event, Comstock will present her scientific findings and Liedtke will discuss the intimate conversations and emotions involved with his project.

The free public forum begins with a reception in the Psalm Visual Arts Gallery at 6 p.m. and will be followed by a discussion at 7 p.m.

Corban University is located at 5000 Deer Park Dr. SE in Salem. For more information, email Psalm Visual Arts Gallery Director Steve Hunt at shunt@corban.edu or call 503-375-7591.

  • On Oct. 15, Corban University hosts "The Skeleton in the Closet, The Intersection of Art and Science Explore: Body Image, Eating Disorders, Obesity and Pregnancy."