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Corban education majors to benefit from grant

Tuesday, August 28, 2012
  • Corban School of Education alumnas Jenae Dawson and Caitlin Doring prepare to graduate on May 5, 2012.

 

A $36,000 grant to the Salem-Keizer School District will have an immediate impact on Corban education majors throughout the next school year.

The non-profit Oregon Chalkboard Project awarded the grant to give education majors “a robust pipeline that takes teaching candidates through a rigorous classroom experience,” said Sue Hildick, Chalkboard project president, in a “Statesman Journal” story about the grant.

Corban education majors will have the opportunity to learn at three of the five schools selected for the project. This includes the new Chavez Elementary, which is the district’s first “learning lab.” The school features eight classrooms with one-way windows to allow student teachers, district supervisors and others to watch demonstration teachers at work.

“Teacher candidates from Corban University’s elementary education program will be in an extended clinical placement for their student teaching experience,” said Janine Allen, Corban’s dean of education and counseling.  “This will allow a full-year experience in one building instead of changing buildings after an initial student teaching experience.”

Additionally, the grant gives Corban teacher candidates working toward their English as a Second Language (ESOL) endorsement and secondary school candidates the ability to work more closely within an intercultural environment.

Students will begin the collaborative and student teaching portions of the education major on Aug. 27. Approximately 25 percent of Corban’s education students will be directly involved with the Salem-Keizer Collaborative classroom placements with 52 teacher candidates in student teaching or pre-education field experiences during the 2012/2013 school year.

The purpose of the Salem-Keizer Collaborative is to provide a growth opportunity for clinical teachers and teacher candidates through in-depth clinical placements. The collaborative was developed over 18 months and designed to improve student achievement through enhanced student learning and teaching quality.

“This aligns with the goals of Corban University’s School of Education to create teacher leaders passionate for engaged service and leading transformation in their learning communities,” Allen said. “At the end of the day, it is all about student learning and making a difference.”

For more information about Corban University’s School of Education click here.