Navigation

News

Long-time Corban supporter donates a piece of WWII history

Friday, June 29, 2012

 

On June 6, 1944, the U.S. Army waited off a 50-mile section of coastal France for an invasion that would change the course of WWII.

On that pivotal, and deadly day in history, for the U.S. military, “Stars and Stripes” reporters and photographers, (considered the original embedded journalists,) were there capturing the amphibious assault of five beaches along the Normandy coast.
More than 68 years after the D-Day invasion, the Corban University library received a donated original copy of that issue of “Stars and Stripes” and the history it holds within. Howard Games made the donation in memory of the June 6 anniversary of the D-Day invasion.

For Games, the D-Day invasion was more than words in a newspaper.

“I was piloting a B-26 (short-range bomber) and when I came out of the clouds and saw all those ships in the channel, it was quite a sight,” Games said. “I had very little time to take it all in because we were headed into the target and met by gunfire of every sort. I know they had machine guns on us because I could see the red tracer bullets streaking past our plane. It was a miracle all 36 aircraft in our mission landed safely at home.

“But there were a good many boys on the ground that gave their lives that day,” he added. He bought the paper for one penny on June 7, 1944 and mailed it home. It sat folded in a box for more than a half century before being rediscovered. In all, Games piloted his B-26 “Widow Maker” on 62 combat missions throughout WWII.

One reason Games chose to donate the newspaper to the library is to keep the memory of WWII alive in Corban students’ minds. A friend and fellow D-Day survivor recently told him about a young man from England that had never heard of the allied invasion at Normandy.

“I don’t want students from Corban to walk away and not know about the single largest maneuver in military history,” Games said. “It changed the course of the war and history.”