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Renowned Christian psychologist to head free lecture series

Monday, September 6, 2010

 

Between Sept. 20 and 22, Corban University will host one of the nation’s premier Christian psychologists who will “Take Psychology Where Christians and Psychologists Rarely Go.”

The free, 3-day Richard L. Caulkins Annual Lecture Series will be headlined by Dr. Gary R. Collins, a licensed clinical psychologist and author of approximately 200 articles and nearly 60 books, including “The Biblical Basis for Christian Counseling,” Christian Counseling: A Comprehensive Guide” and “Christian Coaching: Helping Others Turn Potential Into Reality.”

He travels internationally and across North America to speak about coaching, leadership, trends in Christian counseling and other related topics. Collins co-founded the American Association of Christian counselors and founded and edited “Christian Counseling Today.” He also maintains a small coaching practice and is a visiting professor at various universities.

Collins’ main lecture, titled “Making a Difference in the World – Taking Psychology where Christians and Psychologists Rarely Go,” will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday Sept. 21 in the Psalm Performing Arts Center at the University’s Salem campus. It will be followed by a question and answer session.

On Monday Sept. 20 at 10 a.m., guests are invited to hear Collins talk about Trends in Christian Counseling and Ministry in the Psalm Center. On Wednesday Sept. 22 at 10 a.m., he will lecture about Christian coaching, based around his book of the same name. Additionally, Collins will speak to various classes during his visit.

The lecture was organized by Associate History Professor John Scott, who said he felt privileged to have Collins come to Corban.

“His books have been used as texts throughout the United States,” Scott said. “Collins has set a standard for superior excellence that has come to mark the Caulkins lectures.”

The Richard L. Caulkins Annual Lecture Series was born in 2003 of a desire to reflect the diversity of education that its namesake, a 54-year veteran of the University, encouraged as a member of both the faculty and administration.

“He was extremely important in the academic history of Corban,” Scott said. “The acceptance of the curriculum by the accrediting agency was largely his doing. He was here so long and taught so many subjects that he was somewhat like a renaissance man.”

The Caulkins series is designed to tap into a broad variety of Christian subjects and has included actors and artists, ethicists, theologians, philosophers, experts in Christian literature and more. The series has never covered psychology and counseling, supporting a desire to bring Collins, a friend of psychology chair Dr. Rich Meyers, to the school.

“The intent of the lectures is to bring to the campus important Christian thinkers and doers,” Scott said. “Christians that are accomplished thinkers and doers have things of value to share.

Students can see people who have attained that level of excellence and be encouraged. It sets a standard where a student can say to themselves, ‘If I apply myself, this is what I can do.’”

Scott hopes to identify and bring a business expert to the Caulkins Lecture Series in the near future. His goal is for students and others to get value from the experience and be enriched because of it.

“I want people to walk away and say ‘I learned some valuable and wide principles for how to live my life,” he said. “You can be a business major or a history major or a psychology major and get some value out of this experience.”

 

Richard L. Caulkins Annual Lecture Series